Episode 22. Corey Brettschneider on Hate Speech

How should states deal with hate speech? The American approach is to protect even the most vile speech. In brokers with low minimum deposit other liberal democracies, especially in Europe, hate speech is more restricted, and permitting unconstrained speech is seen as a failure to respect the groups it targets. Our guest today, Corey Brettschneider, thinks a third way is possible.

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Episode 21. Jon Quong on Self-Defense

In thinking about the rules of war, the trend in contemporary political philosophy has been to start from individual conduct and scale up. War is just many instances of individual self-defense, so the rules about individual self-defense will frame the principles of just warfare. Our guest today, Jon Quong, wants to flip that on its head. To understand whether a given individual is acting rightly in harming another, we need to first settle our views about the social context in which it takes place.

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Episode 20. Garrett Cullity on Climate Change

There is very little any given individual can do to address climate change. How, then, can individuals have a duty to act on carbon emissions? Our guest today, Garrett Cullity, sees a paradox here. He sees a problem drawing a line from collective responsibility for climate change to individual responsibility. Fortunately, Cullity also has a better solution for morally motivating individuals.

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Episode 19. Stuart Green on Property Law

The claim that illegal downloading is stealing has been a mainstay of the entertainment industry’s campaign against music, movie and software piracy. But especially among young people, this idea doesn’t hold much sway. Downloading an illicit MP3 seems like a different kind of wrong from car theft. On this episode of Public Ethics Radio, Stuart Green says that property law has fallen out of sync with people’s underlying moral values. Continue reading

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Episode 18. Prakash Sethi on Apple’s Labor Standards [FIXED]

[UPDATE: Reposted to fix audio problems] For a famously perfectionist company, the labor standards at Apple’s Chinese factories leave much to be desired. And yet, despite months of bad press, Apple’s sales show no sign of flagging. When the media focus dies out, what forces can induce an extremely profitable company to improve its manufacturers’ labor practices? Today on Public Ethics Radio, S. Prakash Sethi discusses the corporate responsibilities of a market leader.

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Episode 18. Prakash Sethi on Apple’s Labor Standards

For a famously perfectionist company, the labor standards at Apple’s Chinese factories leave much to be desired. And yet, despite months of bad press, Apple’s sales show no sign of flagging. When the media focus dies out, what forces can induce an extremely profitable company to improve its manufacturers’ labor practices? Today on Public Ethics Radio, S. Prakash Sethi discusses the corporate responsibilities of a market leader.

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Episode 17. Seth Lazar on Self-Defense in War

Why are soldiers allowed to kill in war?¬†For philosophers who believe in what Seth Lazar calls the “new orthodoxy,” the answer is that soldiers can kill for the same reason anyone can kill: self-defense. War is just individual self-defense writ large. But self-defense, Lazar says, is a deeply problematic basis for something as important as the rules of war.

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